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The Indian slave trade the rise of the English empire in the American South, 1670-1717 by Alan Gallay

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Published by Yale University Press in New Haven .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Great Britain,
  • Southern States

Subjects:

  • Slave trade -- Great Britain -- History -- 17th century.,
  • Slave trade -- Southern States -- History -- 17th century.,
  • Indian slaves -- Southern States -- History -- 17th century.,
  • Indians, Treatment of -- Southern States -- History -- 17th century.,
  • Indians of North America -- Southern States -- Social conditions.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

StatementAlan Gallay.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHT1162 .G35 2002
The Physical Object
Paginationxvii, 444 p. :
Number of Pages444
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3939020M
ISBN 100300087543
LC Control Number2001005270

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  This absorbing book is the first ever to focus on the traffic in Indian slaves during the early years of the American South. The Indian slave trade was of central importance from the Carolina coast to the Mississippi Valley for nearly fifty years, linking southern lives and creating a whirlwind of violence and profit-making, argues Alan Gallay.   The NOOK Book (eBook) of the The Indian Slave Trade: The Rise of the English Empire in the American South, by Alan Gallay at Barnes & Noble. Due to COVID, orders may be delayed. Thank you for your : Alan Gallay. This absorbing book is the first ever to focus on the traffic in Indian slaves during the early years of the American South. The Indian slave trade was of central importance from the Carolina coast to the Mississippi Valley for nearly fifty years, linking southern lives and creating a whirlwind of violence and profit-making, argues Alan Gallay/5(2). This study focuses on the traffic in Indian slaves during the early years of the American South. The Indian slave trade was of central importance from the Carolina coast to the Mississippi Valley /5(2).

This absorbing book is the first ever to focus on the traffic in Indian slaves during the early years of the American South. The Indian slave trade was of central importance from the Carolina coast to the Mississippi Valley for nearly fifty years, linking southern lives and creating a whirlwind of violence and profit-making, argues Alan Gallay. the “Indian slave trade provided the strongest link between the South’s many peoples in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries” (p. 9). These.   Drawing on English, Spanish, and French sources, Alan Gallay has written a superb book on the Indian slave trade that played a central role in the emergence of South Carolina’s economy and political relations while shaping the character of its : Gary B. Nash. The historical record of the Indian slave trade is found in disparate and scattered sources including legislative notes, trade transactions, slaver journals, government correspondence, and especially church records, making it difficult to account for the entire : Dina Gilio-Whitaker.

An independent source showing that the so-called Indians on the Eastern Seaboard (also called Terra Nova), were Moors, is a book called; “Africans and Native Americans”, by Jack D. Forbes. He shows in the book how many so-called Native American Indians were sold into slavery in Africa and Europe. This is the opposite direction in which we were taught the slave trade went in.   Indian Ocean Slavery is a series of articles by Karen Williams on the slave trade across the Indian Ocean and its historical and current effects on global populations. Commissioned for our Academic Space, this series sheds light on a little-known but . Slavery and the Slave Trades in the Indian Ocean and Arab Worlds: Global Connections and Disconnections November 7‐8, Yale University New Haven, Connecticut Straight, No Chaser: Slavery, Abolition, and the Modern Muslim Mind Bernard K. Freamon∗, Seton Hall Law School. Though the Indian slave trade ended the practice of enslaving Native Americans continued, records from J show Native American children were kept as slaves in Long Island, New York. Native Americans had also married while enslaved creating families both .